Seventh-day Adventist Studies


  • The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What We Eat – A Review

    Alan Levinovitz is an assistant professor of Religious Studies at James Madison University, Virginia.

    His book, The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What We Eat, “takes on bestselling physicians and dietitians, exposing the myths behind how we come to believe which foods are good and which are bad—and pointing the way to a truly healthful life, free from the anxiety of what we eat.”

    Whilst the book was fascinating in describing how easily it is for society to be deluded about food issues, the book adds several misconceptions of its own.

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  • Eggs are Not OK

    Australians’ usual egg consumption is a document prepared by researchers at the CSIRO. The CSIRO is the premier Australian government-funded research organisation.

    The conclusion of this document states:

    Eggs provide a low cost, convenient source of protein and other key nutrients. Our results [from the Healthy Diet Score survey] suggest their inclusion in the diet is associated with a higher diet quality, in particular higher consumption vegetables and lower consumption of discretionary foods.

    This document is a marketing document. It needs a lot of imagination to make such a conclusion from the CSIRO’s published research papers. This conclusion also contradicts a number of other studies that show consuming eggs is detrimental.

    I sent an email on 28th October 2017 to the lead author of this document, Dr Gilly Hendrie. Hendrie is also the lead author of a number of journal articles relating to the Healthy Diet Index. A copy of this email can be found at CSIRO Healthy Diet Score and Egg Consumption in Australia

    The response will be published when it is received.

    Read more ⇒

  • CSIRO Healthy Diet Score and Egg Consumption in Australia

    In May 2015, the CSIRO (Australia) Healthy Diet Score survey was launched. This survey describes Australian’s self-reported diets and their compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. As at June 2016, more than 85,000 people have responded.

    This survey was used to justify the “Eggs are OK every day” campaign. This is despite the fact that the only measurable health outcome was weight status and despite the fact that there is only a fair correlation between two different self-reported dietary surveys that were performed a week apart.

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  • Do vegetarians live longer?

    On 2nd February 2017, Melody Ding, a senior researcher from the University of Sydney published an article in The Conversation titled “Do vegetarians live longer? Probably, but not because they’re vegetarian”. Her preferences were revealed early in the article when she writes, “vegetarianism and its more austere cousin, veganism, are becoming increasingly popular”.

    A person calling a vegan diet austere does not know how to cook.

    There is overwhelming evidence that vegans (and particularly whole-food, plant-based vegans) live longer and healthier lives.

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  • The Ketogenic Disadvantage

    Several studies have been published comparing low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets with low-fat diets, mostly regarding the treatment of diabetes in overweight and obese participants. Prominent researchers in this field are Richard Feinman, Stephen Phinney, Mary Vernon, Jeff Volek, Eric Westman, and William Yancy—all supporters of low-carbohydrate dietary regimes.

    Ketosis occurs during starvation. It is not a normal, healthy condition. No animal species or human society normally lives in a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when fat in the body is utilized to obtain energy in the absence of glucose. Glucose is normally obtained from the digestion of carbohydrates. Ketosis results in the production of ketones—acetone being one of the three types of ketones produced during ketosis. Blood acidity rises with an increase in ketones.

    During pregnancy, ketosis has been linked to adverse outcomes for the unborn child.

    Ketogenic diet trials almost invariably compare a ketogenic diet with a mislabeled “low-fat, high-carbohydrate” diet. Both the control diet and the ketogenic diet are not healthy diets—the participants are far from healthy at the start of the trial or at the conclusion.

    The ketogenic trials appear to assume that the only criteria for a healthy diet is the ratio of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Many other components are important for health such as fiber, refined sugars, phytonutrients, and protein sources.

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  • DASH Diet and Blood Pressure

    The concept that diet and blood pressure are linked has been discussed since at least the 1920s. In 1926, Donaldson noted that “vegetarians, we believe, run a consistently lower blood pressure than those who use flesh foods."

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  • How do we know what we know?

    Many “facts” have a long history of discovery, with a sometimes bitter and acrimonious debate before a final acceptance.

    In Life, the Universe and Everything (part of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series), Douglas Adams explains our inability to take in new information as a result of the Someone Else's Problem field. Effrafax of Wug utilised the SEP field to create an invisibility device that would run for a hundred years on a single torch battery. It relied on people's inability to see anything that they do not want to, were not expecting or cannot explain.

    We obtain our information initially from parents and from interacting with the world around us. We learn that fire is something that should be avoided if we put our hand in it.

    As we grow older, we learn from other people, reading, school, television. Observation is not always a reliable guide. It is obvious that the sun and the moon revolve around the earth - we see the sun rise each morning in the east and set at night in the west.

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  • Why are there so many points of view regarding nutrition?

    There can be a tendency for researchers and commentators to become attached to one particular area and not be able to see the relationship and interconnectedness with the different aspects of the same disease.

    Also, much research is focused on individual components of nutrition, such as individual minerals, vitamins, or components such as fats or saturated fats.

    Once again, researchers can become attached to one particular element of nutrition. We search for the magic supplement or the one miraculous cure.

    Nutrition is the result of endless number of components in food. Health is the result of the relationship between all that we eat (and absorb during digestion), our relationships with others, the community that we live in and the world that we inhabit.

    Looking at individual components of food in isolation can never give a complete picture.

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  • The Truth About Soy Myth

    Soybean plantA widely distributed article Tragedy and Hype : Third International Soy Symposium written by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig in March 2000 documents a series of issues relating to soy consumption.

    They claim that “Soy is the next asbestos”, that of contains “anti-nutrients”, causes dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, reproductive problems and much more.

    The book The Whole Soy Story: The Dark Side of America's Favorite Health Food is written by Kaayla Daniel is another source of strong criticism of soy. Sally Fallon was the editor of the book. According to the book,

    Soy is not a health food, does not prevent disease and has not even been proven safe. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies link soy to malnutrition, digestive problems, thyroid dysfunction, cognitive decline, reproductive disorders, even heart disease and cancer.

    Sally Fallon and Mary Enig are co-founders in 1999 of the Weston A Price Foundation. Kaayla Daniel is also a board member of the Weston A Price Foundation. Joseph Mercola, a board member of Weston A Price foundation, is another strong critic of soy.

    One of the longest lived people on earth are from the Okinawa archipelago in southern Japan who consume large amounts of soy products.

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