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  • How to Survive a Pandemic by Michael Greger

    How to Survive a Pandemic by Michael Greger is essential reading for those who wish to understand the history of pandemics and how to minimise their impact on ourselves and our society. The book describes the causes of these diseases and most importantly, how to prevent these events from occurring.

    The majority of infectious diseases (and all viral diseases) result from our interaction with animals. This book, with thousands of references, gives detailed descriptions of our greatest diseases from bubonic plague, smallpox, the deadly influenza of 1918 and the deadly viral diseases SARS, MERS and COVID-19.

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  • Is It Healthy? What are we Comparing

    When we ask the question Is it Healthy?, we need to consider is it healthy compared to what..

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  • Strategies to Assist with Arthritis

    Neal Barnard 1 suggests that the foods below should be initially avoided whilst eliminating potential arthritic triggers. He recommends that meats, dairy products, or eggs should not be reintroduced back into the diet.

    You may be surprised to know how much is known about the causes of rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • The Cause of Type 2 Diabetes

    The cause of type 2 diabetes has been known since at least the 1920s.

    TIn 1923, Dr. P.J. Cammidge wrote "that one of the commonest causes of a seeming progressive failure of carbohydrate tolerance was a conscious or unconscious increase in the fat of the diet."

    J.S. Sweeney Experiments wrote two papers in 1927 and 1928 that showed high fat diets increase insulin resistance.

    Sir Harold Himsworth (1905–93) was a renown medical doctor and researcher. He was appointed Professor of Medicine at the University of London in 1939. He is best known for his work on diabetes although he had many other interests including the effects of radiation, tropical medicine and epidemiology.

    Himsworth presented a paper in 1935, "showing the different diets eaten by different races, nations and social classes throughout the world and a close correlation has been demonstrated between dietary preference and the incidence of diabetes mellitus. [...] A high proportion of carbohydrate and low proportion of fat were found in all cases to be associated with low diabetic incidence, whilst a low proportion of carbohydrate and a high proportion of fat were associated with a high incidence."

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  • The PURE Study Myths

    Dr James Muecke is the Australian of the Year in 2020 which was awarded for his work as an eye-surgeon and his work in preventing blindness.

    Muecke believes that we should be eating more eggs, cheese, meat and dark chocolate to minimise diabetes, its associated blindness (diabetic retinopathy) and diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage of the limbs that is caused by diabetes. 50% of adults with type 2 diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. It can result in pain, numbness and an increase in sensitivity. Diabetes account for more than 80% of amputations.

    Muecke cites the PURE Study to justify his low-carbohydrate, high-fat, animal-based diet.

    The PURE Study is an observational study in 27 countries that examined 225,000 people. The study period is 20 years.

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  • Zinc, Selenium and the Immune System

    Zinc and selenium are important micronutrients required for the immune system to function effectively along with vitamins A, C, E, B6, B12, C, D, E and folic acid and the trace elements iron and copper.

    Both insufficient and excessive intakes of zinc and selenium can have negative consequences on the immune status.

    For the majority of people, low selenium intake is not a major issue. Whole-grains provide provide a more than adequate supply for vegans.

    A serum selenium test shows a short-term status of selenium whilst red blood cell selenium reflects a long-term status.

    Before consuming large amounts of selenium in foods or supplements, it is important to know the true status of your selenium.

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  • Vitamin B12, Homocysteine and Methylmalonic Acid

    B12 is a group of cobalt-containing vitamins. Hydroxocobalamin and cyanocobalamin are synthetic forms of vitamin B12. The two forms of vitamin B12 naturally occurring in foods are methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin. These forms are biologically equivalent.

    B12 is produced by a number of different species of bacteria which is found in the soil, on the surface of some plants and some red and green algae.

    Lack of vitamin B12 can have serious consequences as does high levels of homocysteine. Determining the status of vitamin B12 and homocysteine can be difficult and can be determined by measuring serum vitamin B12, homocysteine and methylmalonic acid (MMA).

    A number of products contain riboflavin, pyridoxine, folate, B12 and methionine way in excess of dietary requirements in an attempt to resolve B12 metabolism problems.

    Many magnesium supplements contain pyridoxine which is usually unnecessary and possibly detrimental.

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  • Mushrooms, Tomatoes and Kale on Toast

    One of the big challenges of a whole-food, plant-based diet is learning to cook without eggs or oils. Eggs are useful for binding foods and to start cooking the first step is often to add an oil to the frying pan or saucepan to fry onions.

    Instead of frying foods, try cooking with water - keeping the lid on the pan to ensure that the water does not evaporate. Add water as required.

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  • Changes to our Health Indicators

    Many of our health indicators have become worse over the past few decades (2000-2020). There has been a decrease in the United States in life expectancy. Below are some of the indicators that have been reduced, resulting in a society that is becoming increasing unhealthy and is placing an unsustainable burden on the families and health care facilities.

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  • Effect of Single High Fat Meal on Blood Flow

    MARS Center for Cocoa Health Science is based at University of California – Davis Campus (which is near Sacramento). Ronald Krauss, one of the authors of Astrup’s 2019 paper WHO draft guidelines on dietary saturated and trans fatty acids: time for a new approach?  is based at University of California – San Francisco campus.

    MARS has contributed $40 million to fund the institute.

    Between 2000 and 2021, the MARS institute has produced 157 articles extolling the benefits of chocolate and cocoa.

    “Everyone knows” that chocolate is really healthy and good for you based on research such as this.

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WHO’s Recommendations

WHO's recommendations on saturated fat are out of date, expert team says.
However, the study has been funded by the dairy and beef industries.
Discover how industry-funded research is deceiving the public.

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