Taiwanese Buddhist Study – Moderation Does Not Work

Everything in moderation is a near unanimous response by health professional, health support organisations and media commentators to solving our health crisis.

A Taiwanese Buddhist study [1] with 4,384 participants compared type 2 diabetes outcomes for lacto-ovo-vegetarians compared with those who consumed meat. The meat-eating group ate only a very small amount of meat.

  • Meat intake for females: 50% consumed less than 10 g/day; 25% consumed less than 2 g/day.
  • Meat intake for males: 50% consumed less than 20 g/day; 25% consumed less than 7 g/day.
  • Fish and meat intake for females: 50% consumed less than 17 g/day; 25% consumed less than 3 g/day
  • Fish and meat intake for males: 50% consumed less than 37 g/day; 25% consumed less than 11 g/day.

There were insufficient numbers to divide the vegetarians into subgroups (pesco, lacto-ovo, vegan). There were 69 vegans (no animal products) and there were no cases of diabetes within this group.

One Big Mac, with 2 meat patties, contains 90 g of meat—so the participants were consuming only a very small amount of meat. Three garden peas weigh a gram.

That minute amount of meat increased the risk of diabetes 4 times for females and 2 times for males. Not an endorsement for moderation.

Footnotes

  1. Chiu, T. H. T. et al. (2014) Taiwanese Vegetarians and Omnivores: Dietary Composition, Prevalence of Diabetes and IFG Marià Alemany (ed.). PLoS ONE. 9 (2), e88547.

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