Diabetes and Obesity


  • Seventh-day Adventists and Health

    A strong commitment to health has been a part of Seventh Adventist’s tradition since in founding in the 1840s.

    Within the Californian Seventh-day Adventist community, as the diet becomes more vegetarian, so do the health outcomes.

    All Californian Seventh-day Adventists are much healthier than the average American.

    Read more ⇒

  • Glucose Tolerance – Comparison of High-Fat and High-Carb Diets

    Way back in 1927, J. S. Sweeney assigned healthy, young medical students into four dietary groups: A high-carbohydrate diet; a high-fat diet; a high-protein diet; and a fasting diet.

    After only two days on their highly improbable diets, the students were given a glucose tolerance test.

    Which diet had the best response to the glucose tolerance test?

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  • Bread Does Not Make You Fat

    Most people are under the impression that starchy foods such as bread and potatoes make you fat. This is not the case - unless you cover your bread and potatoes with high-fat foods such as cheese, butter or sour cream. Excess sugars and carbohydrates are stored as glycogen - not fats. Carbohydrates are not converted to fats. Animals, bacteria and fungi convert glucose to glycogen which is the form that glucose is stored. Except in abnormal, extreme conditions, carbohydrates are not converted to fat in humans. Fats make you fat - not carbohydrates.

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  • Taiwanese Buddhist Study

    Everything in moderation is a near unanimous response by health professional, health support organisations and media commentators to solving our health crisis.

    A Taiwanese Buddhist study 1 with 4,384 participants compared type 2 diabetes outcomes for lacto-ovo-vegetarians compared with those who consumed meat. The meat-eating group ate only a very small amount of meat.

    Read more ⇒

  • How do Your Genes Affect Obesity and Diabetes

    The purpose of the DIETFITS Trial was "to determine the effect of a healthy low-fat (HLF) diet vs a healthy low-carbohydrate (HLC) diet on weight change and if genotype pattern or insulin secretion are related to the dietary effects on weight loss".

    It a popular area of research to determine if there are genetic causes of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, autoimmune disease, depression and any other illness or condition that is plaguing our society.

    This area of research ignores the fact that often our genetics does not determine health outcomes.  Ignoring this will not solve the problems of our society's rapidly failing health.

    Frequently the problem is not that complicated.

    Read more ⇒


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WHO’s Recommendations

WHO's recommendations on saturated fat are out of date, expert team says.
However, the study has been funded by the dairy and beef industries.
Discover how industry-funded research is deceiving the public.