Diabetes and Obesity


  • The PURE Study Myths

    Dr James Muecke is the Australian of the Year in 2020 which was awarded for his work as an eye-surgeon and his work in preventing blindness.

    Muecke believes that we should be eating more eggs, cheese, meat and dark chocolate to minimise diabetes, its associated blindness (diabetic retinopathy) and diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage of the limbs that is caused by diabetes. 50% of adults with type 2 diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. It can result in pain, numbness and an increase in sensitivity. Diabetes account for more than 80% of amputations.

    Mueke cites the PURE Study to justify his low-carbohydrate, high-fat, animal-based diet.

    The PURE Study is an observational study in 27 countries that examined 225,000 people. The study period is 20 years.

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  • Changes to our Health Indicators

    Many of our health indicators have become worse over the past few decades (2000-2020). There has been a decrease in the United States in life expectancy. Below are some of the indicators that have been reduced, resulting in a society that is becoming increasing unhealthy and is placing an unsustainable burden on the families and health care facilities.

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  • Lessons from The China Study

    Colin Campbell was a nutritional biochemist at Cornell University. In the 1960s, he was involved in nutritional programs in the Philippines to help families provide for their critically undernourished children. Peanuts were one of their preferred sources of protein. It is a legume— great for improving the soil, easy to grow, and is nutritious and tasty.

    At the same time, children younger than 10, were dying at alarming rates from liver cancer. Normally liver cancer is an adult disease— and the children dying from the disease were from the most affluent suburbs in Manila. These are the families that could afford the best housing and the best food.

    Whilst in the Philippines, he read a paper in an obscure medical journal. Rats were fed aflatoxin— one of the deadliest carcinogens known. One group of rats was given a diet of 20% protein —and they all died of liver cancer. The second group was given a diet of 5% protein— and they all lived. 100% deaths compared to zero deaths. They were all fed aflatoxin— but only those rats that had a high protein diet died.

    A 20% diet of wheat protein, gluten, or pea protein did not result in liver cancer deaths whereas casein, which comprises of 80% of the protein found in cow’s milk, and albumin, which is found in egg white, did result in liver cancer deaths. Plant-based diets are often considered to be lysine deficient. However, adding the amino acid lysine to the wheat protein to match the level found in casein also resulted in cancer deaths.

    Significantly, peanuts and corn in the Philippines were often contaminated by aflatoxin— and the wealthy ate Western-style diets, one rich in protein.

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  • South Australia Department of Health – Dr James Muecke Communication

    A letter was sent to the South Australian Department of Health on the 11th January 2021 after they declined to investigate the claims of Dr James Muecke, the Australian of the Year in 2020.

    He is trying to convince Australians to eat more meat, eggs and dairy to prevent diabetes, diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy.

    Australia is ranked number 2 in meat consumption, just behind United States but in front of Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and New Zealand.

    The response stated that they can only address specific cases. The unsubstantiated claims of Muecke can continue to be disseminated to the detriment of our health.

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  • PREDIMED Trial – Mediterranean Diet with Olive Oil or Nuts

    The PREDIMED trial examined 7447 participants ranging from 55 to 80 years of age who were at high cardiovascular risk, but with no cardiovascular disease at enrollment, to one of three diets: a “Mediterranean Diet” supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil; a “Mediterranean Diet” supplemented with mixed nut; or a control diet with advice to reduce dietary fat.

    The “Mediterranean Diet” was the participants normal diet.

    50% of the participants that did not have metabolic syndrome at the start of the trial, were afflicted at the end of the trial.

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  • Rural Indian Regional Diets

    Despite India's reputation for a healthy, vegetarian cuisine, it is not justified. Only 1.6% of Indians are vegan, 24% are lacto-vegetarian. 3% add eggs to their lacto-vegetarian diet which leaves 72% consuming meat.

    The Indian population has the highest prevalence of diabetes worldwide and exhibits high-risk metabolic profiles at younger ages and lower body mass index than their Western counterparts. There are significant regional variations to this observation.

    The reasons why Asian populations exhibit diabetes at a lower threshold than western populations are not known.

    According to WHO mortality statistics, India is ranked 17 for Low Birth Rate, 37 for Diarrhoeal Diseases, 40 for Tuberculosis, 60 for Malnutrition and 62 for Influenza & Pneumonia out of 183 countries.

    Given the current increase in consumption of meat and oils and a decrease in grains, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes is likely to continue.

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  • Seventh-day Adventists and Health

    A strong commitment to health has been a part of Seventh Adventist’s tradition since in founding in the 1840s.

    Within the Californian Seventh-day Adventist community, as the diet becomes more vegetarian, so do the health outcomes.

    All Californian Seventh-day Adventists are much healthier than the average American.

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  • Glucose Tolerance – Comparison of High-Fat and High-Carb Diets

    Way back in 1927, J. S. Sweeney assigned healthy, young medical students into four dietary groups: A high-carbohydrate diet; a high-fat diet; a high-protein diet; and a fasting diet.

    After only two days on their highly improbable diets, the students were given a glucose tolerance test.

    Which diet had the best response to the glucose tolerance test?

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  • Bread Does Not Make You Fat

    Most people are under the impression that starchy foods such as bread and potatoes make you fat. This is not the case - unless you cover your bread and potatoes with high-fat foods such as cheese, butter or sour cream. Excess sugars and carbohydrates are stored as glycogen - not fats. Carbohydrates are not converted to fats. Animals, bacteria and fungi convert glucose to glycogen which is the form that glucose is stored. Except in abnormal, extreme conditions, carbohydrates are not converted to fat in humans. Fats make you fat - not carbohydrates.

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  • Taiwanese Buddhist Study

    Everything in moderation is a near unanimous response by health professional, health support organisations and media commentators to solving our health crisis.

    A Taiwanese Buddhist study 1 with 4,384 participants compared type 2 diabetes outcomes for lacto-ovo-vegetarians compared with those who consumed meat. The meat-eating group ate only a very small amount of meat.

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WHO’s Recommendations

WHO's recommendations on saturated fat are out of date, expert team says.
However, the study has been funded by the dairy and beef industries.
Discover how industry-funded research is deceiving the public.

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Low-carbohydrate Mania

Low-carbohydrate Mania: The Fantasies, Delusions, and Myths

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Center for Nutrition Studies

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