Dairy


  • Comparison of Dairy Milks with Human Milk

    Milks are complex lipid emulsions in water containing protein, fat, lactose, vitamins and minerals, as well as enzymes, hormones and immunoglobulins which provide initial immunity functions,

    There is approximately 5,500 species of mammals which initially supply their young with milk. There are vast differences in milk composition among the mammal species.

    Mammals provide milk for their growing infants that provide a unique collection of proteins, carbohydrates and fats.

    Human milk is markedly different to other mammals, in particular to its protein content.

    Proteins in human milk provide sufficient of protein to sustain infants for the first six months without any additional food, as well as supplying the means of establishing suitable environment for the growth of healthy intestinal bacteria and providing the proteins involved in the immune system.

    Read more ⇒

  • The Problem With Cow’s Milk

    Skin and intestinal reactions to cow’s milk was described by Hippocrates (460-370 B.C.) and Galen of Pergamum (130-210 AD), both Greek physicians so there has been an awareness of problems with cow’s milk for a considerable period of time.

    Cow’s milk is the most common form of allergic reactions, although the actual prevalence is disputed.

    Mammals have evolved over millions of years to provide nutrition for their infants in the first stage of life. There are significant difference between species depending upon factors such as rates of growth.

    A bull reaches maturity at 9-10 months, so the rate of growth is markedly different to humans. Consequently, the composition of bovine milk is very different to that of humans. The consequences of cow’s milk consumption are potentially harmful.

    Read more ⇒

  • The Nature of Food Allergies

    Food allergies have become a major concern with parents, health practitioners and school administrators. However, the estimates of prevalence of allergies varies widely.

    A commonly accepted definition is an “adverse immune response that occurs reproducibly on exposure to a given food and is distinct from other adverse responses to food, such as food intolerance, pharmacologic reactions, and toxin-mediated reactions.”

    However, most people are not going to make such a fine distinction between food allergy and food intolerance. Non-celiac gluten-sensitivity (NCGS) does not cause an IgE response so with this definition it not classed as a food allergy.

    Dairy, in particular, cow’s milk and gluten, wheat and grains are commonly avoided as a result of concerns about food allergies.

    Read more ⇒


Search

WHO’s Recommendations

WHO's recommendations on saturated fat are out of date, expert team says.
However, the study has been funded by the dairy and beef industries.
Discover how industry-funded research is deceiving the public.

Three eBooks

Low-carbohydrate Mania

Low-carbohydrate Mania: The Fantasies, Delusions, and Myths

Testimonials

Center for Nutrition Studies

Center for Nutrition Studies