Michael Mosley and Coconut Oil

Dr Michael Mosely (Trust Me, I’m a Doctor) instigated a trial to determine the impact of coconut oil on cardio-vascular health.

94 participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups. They were asked to consume an additional 50g of fat – either coconut oil, butter or olive oil, daily for a period of four weeks.

The main measure was the change in total cholesterol.

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Dr William Roberts – Causes of Heart Disease from an Expert

William Roberts is a leading cardiovascular pathologist. He is the current editor (at 2016) of the American Journal of Cardiology—a position he has held since 1982. He has published over 1,500 articles. Roberts served as the first head of the pathology service at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health from 1964 to 1993. He has been located at Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute and Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, Texas since 1993.

He is a genuine expert in heart disease. View his videos on heart disease.

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Why are there so many points of view regarding nutrition?

There can be a tendency for researchers and commentators to become attached to one particular area and not be able to see the relationship and interconnectedness with the different aspects of the same disease.

Also, much research is focused on individual components of nutrition, such as individual minerals, vitamins, or components such as fats or saturated fats.

Once again, researchers can become attached to one particular element of nutrition. We search for the magic supplement or the one miraculous cure.

Nutrition is the result of endless number of components in food. Health is the result of the relationship between all that we eat (and absorb during digestion), our relationships with others, the community that we live in and the world that we inhabit.

Looking at individual components of food in isolation can never give a complete picture.

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Dr. Neal Barnard’s Program for Reversing Diabetes

For a person with Type II diabetes, the problem is that sugar (glucose) is not able to pass from the bloodstream into the cells. Since the glucose cannot get into the cells, it ends up in the blood stream and removed from the body in urine.

It seems obvious that if you have too much sugar in your blood then you need to limit the amount of sugar and starch in your diet. Starches are complex carbohydrates that consists of many glucose molecules.

The diet of people that live in countries that have low incidence of diabetes do not have a diet remotely like the standard diabetic diet. They eat a diet that is high in complex carbohydrates.

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Dr Caldwell Esselstyn

Dr Esselstyn is US surgeon who has researched the effects of diet and health. He is one of the doctors along with Colin Campbell and Dean Ornish that Bill Clinton has credited with his health transformation.

He won an Olympic gold medal in rowing at the 1956 Olympics. He was an army surgeon in Vietnam, a member of the Board of Governors of the Cleveland Clinic, one of the world’s top cardiac centres and was named in 1994-1995 as one of the top doctors in USA.

Dr. Esselstyn argues that a plant-based, oil-free diet can not only prevent and stop the progression of heart disease, but also reverse its effects.

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Dr Neal Barnard

Neal Barnard, MD, is a clinical researcher, author, and health advocate. He has been involved with a number of clinical trials investigating the effects of diet on health.

He is an associate professor of medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and the president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

His book, Dr Neal Barnard’s Program to Reverse Diabetes Now, outlines a whole-food, plant-based diet that reverses diabetes, prevents and reverses heart disease and other common ailments.

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Dan Buettner – Blue Zones

In the early 1970s, National Geographic magazine approached the world-renowned physician, Alexander Leaf, asking him to visit, study, and write an article about the world’s healthiest and most long-living people.

More recently, Dan Buettner began his research into Blue Zone examining communities in Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and Loma Linda, California.

He published an article Secrets in Longevity in National Geographic Magazine’s November 2005 edition In April 2008, Buettner released a book on The Blue Zone: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, through National Geographic Books. A second edition has recently been published.

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The Scientific Basis of Vegetarianism – William Harris, MD

Dr Harris was born in 1930. He is a pilot, trampoline exponent and long term nutritional advocate.

His book The Scientific Basis of Vegetarianism is a landmark study in nutrition.

Animal source food is adaptive when there’s not enough food, but in a world with abundant and diverse plant foods, animal source food is obsolete and only causes problems.

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Professor Katharine Milton – Professor of Physical Anthropology at University of California(Berkeley).

Professor Katharine Milton – Professor of Physical Anthropology at University of California(Berkeley).

She has published many papers regarding nutrition and dietary ecology in primates, including apes, early humans and modern humans. Other research interests include conservation biology, nutrient and anti-nutrient components of wild plant and digestive physiology.

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Dr Dean Ornish

Commencing in 1977, Ornish has directed a series of clinical research studies proving, for the first time, that comprehensive lifestyle changes could not only stop the progression of heart disease, but could reverse it.

These lifestyle changes included a whole foods, plant-based diet, smoking cessation, moderate exercise, stress management techniques including yoga and meditation, and social and community support.

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